Tag Archives | kosher

Pesach 2014– What to make!

Pesach is quickly approaching!

Here are five tasty look­ing recipes that I am excited to make for Passover this year. Whether you are hav­ing a fully vegan seder (kudos to you if you are!!!!!) or are bring­ing a dish to a large gath­er­ing, you want to impress. These recipes might just do the trick. Let me know which ones are your favourites!

1. The Best Shred­ded Kale Salad. This is EXTREMELY tasty. I’ve made this for lunch quite a few times and I can never just eat one bowl. So you might want to dou­ble the recipe. It’s that good.

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2. Per­haps this Por­to­bello, Spinach, and Potato Matzo Mina with Basil Wal­nut Pesto and a Cashew Béchamel Sauce will float your boat.

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 3. Or how about a sim­ple, gorgeous-looking, Roasted Beet Salad with Mint.

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4. These Vegan and Gluten-Free Stuffed Pota­toes are a nice addi­tion to any seder meal.

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5.  Of course, a clas­sic Vegan Matzo Ball Soup with Spring Veg­eta­bles is a great starter.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

 

 

Gutt Yon­tiff!

Oy Vegan!

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Even Kosher meat in Israel is unethical

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Israeli food giant admits to abu­sive slaugh­ter­house con­di­tions that ‘would hor­rify’ meat eaters. In response to class-action suits prompted by inves­tiga­tive report, Tnuva says con­sumers don’t want to know how the sausages are made– even when they’re kosher.”

Read Haaretz arti­cle here.

Oy Vegan!

 

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Green Cooking — Tu B’Shvat!

Come cel­e­brate and cook a scrump­tious vegan meal with me on Tues­day at 7pm! We’ll wine, dine, and cel­e­brate the new year of the trees! Lim­ited space avail­able. Sign up now!

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Is Your Meat Really Kosher???

Last fall, I did a work­shop at the Wol­fond Cen­tre Hil­lel at the Uni­ver­sity of Toronto. My objec­tive was to get stu­dents to think about where their food comes from. There were a few veg­e­tar­i­ans in the room, but it was pri­mar­ily filled with meat eaters. When I talked about the hor­ri­ble abuses and tor­tur­ous con­di­tions of fac­tory farms, I was met with a lot of this,

Well, that’s really bad, but, I’m kosher so… the ani­mals have been killed humanely.”

If you are kosher and you think the meat on your plate has been eth­i­cally raised/ treated/ killed, think again.

Click here for more information.

You can also check out this video that my friends over at The Shamayim V’Aretz Insti­tute put together.

Also, one of my favourite authors, Jonathan Safran Foer nar­rated a doc­u­men­tary some years ago about the kosher meat indus­try. Watch the trailer below.

Peo­ple don’t like to know about or watch the suf­fer­ing of ani­mals because it’s uncom­fort­able and upset­ting. Yet, it is also the truth.

The real ques­tion is, once we open our eyes and real­ize what is tak­ing place, what are we going to do about it? Stand idly by or take action. Please con­sider shar­ing this and start­ing a dis­cus­sion with those around you.

Oy Vegan!

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A falafel a day keeps the doctor away…

Eat­ing Vegan in Israel was not as chal­leng­ing as I might have thought. Blog­ging while lead­ing a Birthright trip was what proved to be impossible!

Apolo­gies for the multi-week hia­tus but I was incred­i­bly busy bus­ing around Israel, rid­ing camels, sleep­ing 3 hours a night, and eat­ing my fair share of hummus.

Shirel and I on a camel in the Negev. Photo cour­tesy of Jaclyn Adler

What a trip! Eat­ing vegan in Israel is totally doable. In the morn­ings, I usu­ally ate veg­gies and toast. For lunch, I usu­ally ate falafel. If you want the best falafel ever, you have to come to Israel! The falafel is always fresh and well sea­soned. The top­pings are also fresh and flavour­ful and the pita is light and fluffy. Best of all, it’s totally vegan. Falafel is a way of life in the holy land. Peo­ple eat it all the time, so there are places that only sell falafel.

Falafel in Zichron Ya’akov

On occa­sion, for lunch, I would spring for pasta with veg­gies or pizza with­out cheese. They’ll make it for you at Big Apple Pizza in Jerusalem if you order at least 2 slices. Din­ners usu­ally con­sisted of salad and some sort of veg­e­tar­ian main. Because I was with my birthright trip we always ate kosher. So when it was kosher meat — I didn’t have to worry about dairy in the veg dish. (Kosher law pro­hibits the mix­ing of meat and dairy.)

A few nights I had cous­cous with a veg­gie stew on top. The veg­eta­bles in Israel are super fresh and flavour­ful so it was a real treat. The only thing to watch for is egg because even though Kosher Parve excludes dairy, egg doesn’t fall under the dairy category.

What is Parve you might ask?

Def­i­n­i­tion: Parve is a Hebrew term (pareve is the Yid­dish term) that describes food with­out any meat or dairy ingre­di­ents. Jew­ish dietary laws con­sid­ers pareve food to be neu­tral; Pareve food can be eaten with both meat and milk dishes. Fish, eggs, fruits and veg­eta­bles are parve. Source

The good news is, you can find a lot of tasty ice cream and desserts that are parve! One of my favourites were the water­melon popsicles.

Eat­ing Parve Ice Cream in Tzfat

Eat­ing a water­melon pop­si­cle in the old city, Jerusalem

Luck­ily, after those beau­ti­ful 10 days of birthright fun, I was able to hang out in Israel for a few more days on my own. Dur­ing that time,  I vis­ited a few of the country’s veg­gie estab­lish­ments. One notable one was Vil­lage Green Veg­e­tar­ian Restau­rant in Jerusalem on Jaffa Road.

I came here with an old friend who I vol­un­teered with in Eilat in 2007 to grab some veg food and catch up on the past 5 years of our lives.

The food was great. They had a huge selec­tion of sal­ads, both hot and cold, which you could mix and match and pay for accord­ing to the weight of your plate.

They had a fab­u­lous baked tofu salad that was delight­ful as well as home­made sei­tan that was seri­ously tasty.

I really loaded up my plate with sal­ads at Vil­lage Green. Pic­tured here is brown rice with peanut gin­ger sauce, baked tofu, sei­tan salad, cucum­bers, roasted pota­toes, pasta, lentil salad, and more!

I was also excited to find out that there is a whole plethora of veg­gie restau­rants in Israel. Espe­cially in Tel Aviv. Unfor­tu­nately, the days I had to myself in Israel fell over Shab­bat and Shavu­out, so most places were closed. But I am def­i­nitely going to explore these restau­rants and vegan cul­ture when I return.

I had my eye on Bud­dha Burg­ers and Taam Hachaim in Tel Aviv. I actu­ally went to Bud­dha Burg­ers one day and they were closed because of Shavuot.

So, all in all, Israel is vegan friendly. You just have to know how to ask about your food. I look for­ward to try­ing out more of Israel’s vegan and veg­gie restau­rants when I return. Until then, I’m going to work on per­fect­ing my own home­made falafel. Wish me luck!

Next year in Jerusalem!

Oy Vegan!
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Eco-Kosher Means Veggie-Kosher!

Shout out to veggiejews.org for this inter­est­ing arti­cle on how being Eco-kosher really means being veggie!

Oy Vegan!

 

 

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