Tag Archives | Thanksgiving

What I’m bringing to Thanksgiving this year!

Giv­ing a lot of thanks this year for many things. A new house and a new love on the way! That’s right, we’re expect­ing. I’m 19 weeks preg­nant. I have lots to share about my expe­ri­ence so far.. includ­ing what I’ve been eating/ what sup­ple­ments I’ve been tak­ing. Stay tuned for upcom­ing posts. I would love to hear from other preg­nant vegan mamas out there!

In the mean­time, I wanted to share with you what I’m plan­ning to make for Cana­dian Thanks­giv­ing this year.

I’m super excited for this recipe. I couldn’t sleep the other night, was brows­ing Pin­ter­est and came across this gem.

Puff Pas­try Wrapped Lentil Loaf!

puff-pastry-wrapped-lentil-loaf

I’m cur­rently on the hunt for vegan pas­try that I can quickly braid over the lentil loaf. This recipe looks so scrumptious.

I’ll be mak­ing my Por­to­bello Mush­room Gravy to pour on top. I’m mak­ing a dou­ble batch this year as I’ll be attend­ing two din­ners and I def­i­nitely don’t want to run out. mmmmm mush­room gravy.…

Instead of mak­ing pump­kin pie this year, I’m tak­ing the easy way out and buy­ing a vegan pump­kin pie. Actu­ally I’ve already bought a few of them. One for each din­ner and an extra for daily con­sump­tion (obvi­ously). Right now many Toronto bak­eries are stock­ing them includ­ing Apieca­lypse Now, Through Being Cool Vegan Bak­ing Co., Bunner’s Bake Shop, Tori’s Bakeshop and even Whole Foods (Yorkville)!

Overview of Pumpkin Pie

I will also be bring­ing a Tofurky Roast for fun.

I’m count­ing on oth­ers to pro­vide the roasted veg­gie side dishes. But if you are look­ing for ideas, here are some tasty ones.

So happy thanks­giv­ing to one and all. Let us take time this thanks­giv­ing to think of the beau­ti­ful, intel­li­gent, and socia­ble turkeys who are killed in the name of a hol­i­day which is sup­posed to be about grat­i­tude and the harvest.

Let us instead enjoy the mul­ti­tude of plant-based dishes avail­able to us and cher­ish being with loved ones big and small. Happy thanksgiving.

Oy Vegan!

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Cruelty-free Thanksgiving and Fall So Delicious Giveaway!

Thanks­giv­ing just came and went here in Canada and I thought I would share some of the recipes we made in hon­our of the upcom­ing fall sea­son (also ben­e­fit­ting all those cel­e­brat­ing Amer­i­can Thanks­giv­ing next month).

You can find the Fall So Deli­cious Give­away in the mid­dle of this post!

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We made a bunch of amaz­ing dishes (pic­tured above). Oven-roasted Brus­sels sprouts with gar­lic, gin­ger car­rots (recipe below), gar­lic mashed pota­toes (recipe below), vegan stuff­ing, all slathered in Por­to­bello mush­room gravy (recipe below), cran­berry sauce, and the Hol­i­day Roast from Gardein.

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For dessert I made the chilled chocolate-espresso torte with toasted hazel­nut crust and raw pumpkin-maple pie with baked oat crust (both pic­tured below) from The Oh She Glows Cook­book. My fam­ily LOVED these tortes. I def­i­nitely rec­om­mend them!

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We also enjoyed So Deli­cious’ new win­ter bev­er­ages. Pump­kin Spice, Mint Choco­late, and Nog coconut milk. They were all super tasty and we were all very impressed with how low-fat and low-cal they were in com­par­i­son with the real thing– not to men­tion being cruelty-free!

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Which brings me to my next announcement…

THE FALL SO DELICIOUS GIVEAWAY!

We are giv­ing five lucky read­ers a VIP coupon for a free So Deli­cious prod­uct like their new hol­i­day beverages.

TO ENTER, look below to like Oy Vegan! on Face­book, fol­low us on twit­ter, and respond to this blog post with an answer to the fol­low­ing ques­tion: What autumn recipes do you want me to veganize?

This con­test closes next Sat­ur­day Octo­ber 25 at mid­night.  Con­test open to res­i­dents of Canada.

Best of luck!

a Raf­fle­copter give­away

Here are some Thanks­giv­ing recipes that will knock people’s socks off.

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Por­to­bello Mush­room Gravy

Yield: Just over 2 cups of gravy

Ingre­di­ents

• 1 table­spoon of extra-virgin olive oil

• 1 onions, chopped

• 2 cloves of gar­lic, minced

• 2 medium por­to­bello mush­rooms cleaned and chopped

• 2 1/4 cups of veg­etable broth

• 3 table­spoons Tamari or soy sauce

• 1/4 tea­spoon dried thyme

• 1/8 tea­spoon of sage

• 3 table­spoons of corn starch

• 6 table­spoons of water

• Pep­per to taste

Instruc­tions

1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over low to medium heat.

2. Add onion and cook for 4 min­utes until soft­ened and translu­cent. Add gar­lic and cook for another 30 sec­onds to a minute.

3. Add mush­rooms and cook, stir­ring often, till they begin to release their juices for about 10 minutes.

4. Add broth, Tamari/soy sauce, thyme, and sage and sim­mer for 10 minutes.

5. Mix corn­starch and water in a small bowl. Once thor­oughly com­bined, add to gravy and stir until thick­ened about 10 more min­utes. Sea­son with pepper.

6. For a smooth gravy, pour into a blender or Vita­mix OR use a hand­held immer­sion blender to purée .

7. Slather over every­thing and enjoy!

Sasha’s Gar­lic Mashed Potatoes

Yield: Serves 7 people

Ingre­di­ents

• Head of garlic

• 6 large Rus­set pota­toes, washed, peeled and quartered

• 1/2–1 cup of Earth Balance/ vegan mar­garine (amount depends on preference)

• tea­spoon of salt

• hand­ful of chives, chopped (optional)

Instruc­tions

1. Pre­heat the oven to 375 degrees F

2. Slice the top off the head of gar­lic and wrap the head of gar­lic in alu­minium foil and place in the oven for 25 minutes.

3. Mean­while, bring a large of pot of salted water to boil. Add pota­toes and sim­mer on low, cov­ered for 20 min­utes or until a fork can be inserted into pota­toes. They should be soft but not falling apart.

4. Once cooked, drain pota­toes in a colander.

5. Once gar­lic is cooked, unwrap and squeeze the gar­lic out a clove at a time into a big bowl. It should be cooked and gooey.  Add Earth Bal­ance or vegan mar­garine to gar­lic paste and mix together with a fork.

6. Put the pota­toes through a ricer into the bowl with the gar­licky but­tery mix­ture. If you don’t have a ricer, you can mash with a potato masher or with the back of a big fork.

7. Stir in chives if using.

8. Enjoy!

Gin­ger Carrots

Yield: Serves 7 people

Ingre­di­ents

• 2 lb bag of car­rots, washed and peeled

• 1/2 cup of Earth Balance/vegan margarine

• 2 table­spoons of gin­ger, peeled and roughly chopped

Instruc­tions

1. Cut car­rots length-wise into small sticks

2. Place Earth Bal­ance and gin­ger in a medium pot and heat over a medium heat until Earth Bal­ance is melted.

3. Add car­rots and cook for 15–20 min­utes or until car­rots are soft­ened. Car­rots should be par­tially sub­merged in the vegan mar­garine. Add more vegan mar­garine as needed.

4. Enjoy!

 

Oy Vegan!

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Stay Tuned: SO DELICIOUS giveaway!

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So I have been obsessed with coconut milk recently and believe me when I say So Deli­cious makes an amaz­ing coconut milk. I’ve been using it a lot in my morn­ing smooth­ies but it also is great with chai tea, in soups, pump­kin pie, and in sauces. Because I am cuckoo for coconuts, it is with great excite­ment that I announce that the week after Cana­dian Thanks­giv­ing, Oy Vegan will be giv­ing away a VIP coupon for a free So Deli­cious prod­uct to five lucky read­ers.  Stay tuned for more details!

Oy Vegan!

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Oy Vegan Top 5 Thanksgiving Recipes!

Won­der­ing what to cook for thanks­giv­ing din­ner this week­end? Here are 5 mouth­wa­ter­ing recipes that will impress every­one veg and non-veg alike.

 

1. Por­to­bello Mush­room Gravy

This gravy is seri­ously addic­tive! Peo­ple “ooo” and “aaah” over it every year. Trust me, it’ll be a hit!

2. Pump­kin Pecan Pie

Party Vegan by Robin Robert­son also has an awe­some recipe for pump­kin pecan pie which I love to make. I like how this recipe from Whole­foods incor­po­rates pecans into the crust. I pre­fer to top my pie with pecans mixed with maple syrup and melted earth bal­ance for a tasty topping.

3. Baked tofu or Tofurkey

As a tofu lover, I find a nice mar­i­nated and baked tofu is great on Thanks­giv­ing, but for the tra­di­tion­al­ist, Tofurkey offers great animal-friendly options.

4. Roasted Veg­gies

This recipe from gluten-free god­dess is sweet and satisfying.

5. Vegan Scal­loped Potatoes

This recipe from Post Punk Kitchen will rock your socks.

There you have it! A vegan thanks­giv­ing feast!

I know I wrote about how incred­i­bly kind and social turkeys are last year, but I can’t say it enough… turkeys rock! This thanks­giv­ing, let’s raise a toast to them and how won­der­ful they are!

Let us also hold a moment of silence for all the turkeys who are slaugh­tered at this time of year. I’ll never for­get the late turkeys of Cedar Row Farm Sanc­tu­ary, whose joy­ous spir­its and ener­gies touched me on my visit a few octo­bers ago. Sadly, they died from chest issues as their breasts had become painfully, over­whelm­ing large, some­thing that turkeys bread for meat com­monly expe­ri­ence. They were so won­der­ful and friendly and I will never for­get my encounter that fall day.

Late turkeys of Cedar Row Farm Sanctuary

So let’s raise a glass to our fine feath­ered friends and encour­age oth­ers to dine with us on incred­i­bly deli­cious, nutri­tious, earth-friendly, and animal-friendly thanks­giv­ing meals.

Oy Vegan!

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Happy Thanksliving

In Canada, we already cel­e­brated our Thanks­giv­ing in Octo­ber. How­ever, I want to take this oppor­tu­nity to wish all my south­ern neigh­bours a Happy Thanks­giv­ing… or should I say Thanksliv­ing.

While Amer­i­cans gather together with fam­ily and friends on this day of thanks and boun­teous food, I think it’s impor­tant to con­sider just where this food came from. The first thing peo­ple asso­ciate with Thanks­giv­ing is, in most cases, Turkey. In fact, you’ve prob­a­bly heard or even said “Happy Turkey Day!” your­self at some point.

 My friends at Cedar Row Farm Sanc­tu­ary 2010

Turkeys, in my expe­ri­ence, are extremely friendly and intel­li­gent birds. I hap­pened to meet some on my visit to Cedar Row Farm Sanc­tu­ary last year. They came right up to me with warm greet­ings when I arrived. I was bowled over by how friendly and socia­ble they were. Not just with each other but with people!

After our visit, I was touched by my expe­ri­ence with the turkeys and dis­turbed that the the word turkey is almost syn­ony­mous with food on Thanks­giv­ing. If only peo­ple knew more about turkeys then they might not be so quick to eat them on Thanksgiving.

Thank­fully, every year Farm Sanc­tu­ary cel­e­brates a turkey-free Thanks­giv­ing feast and encour­ages peo­ple to Adopt-A-Turkey.  Through this pro­gram peo­ple can save a turkey by spon­sor­ing it with a one time dona­tion of $30. Farm Sanc­tu­ary has res­cued over 1,000 turkeys since 1996. This pro­gram also seeks to edu­cate peo­ple on the sit­u­a­tion fac­ing turkeys today such as fac­tory farm­ing con­di­tions and facts about turkeys as a species.

 AWESOME TURKEY FACTS!

National shel­ter direc­tor of Farm Sanc­tu­ary, Susie Cos­ton, shares her top 10 facts about turkeys:

Susie Coston’s Top 10 Fas­ci­nat­ing Facts about Farm Sanctuary’s Res­cued Turkeys

  1. Between 1965 and 2000, the weight of the aver­age turkey raised for food in the U.S. increased by 57 per­cent, from an aver­age of 18 pounds to an aver­age of 28.2 pounds, pre­vent­ing commercially-raised turkeys from per­form­ing their nat­ural behav­iors and caus­ing them to suf­fer from crip­pling foot and leg problems.
  1. Wild turkeys, who weigh between 8–18 pounds, are able to fly up to 55 miles an hour, but turkeys raised for meat on fac­tory farms are so large they can’t even perch. When turkeys arrive at Farm Sanctuary’s shel­ters, they attempt to perch and even fly until they are too large to do so.
  1. Indus­trial turkeys’ unnat­ural weight causes many health prob­lems, includ­ing heart dis­ease, heart attack, and arthri­tis, at as young as one month of age. At our sanc­tu­ar­ies, we have to feed our turkeys res­cued from indus­trial farms a restricted diet to ensure that they will live long, healthy lives, oth­er­wise they will gain even more weight than the aver­ages listed previously.
  1. Turkeys rec­og­nize each other by their unique voices. Researchers have iden­ti­fied nearly 30 dis­tinct vocal­iza­tions in wild turkeys.
  1. Like dogs and cats, turkeys are highly intel­li­gent and emo­tional ani­mals who show great affec­tion to oth­ers and form strong social bonds with other turkeys in their flock that last a lifetime.
  1. Turkeys have excel­lent geog­ra­phy skills and can learn the spe­cific details of an area of more than 1,000 acres.
  1. On fac­tory farms, turkeys fre­quently have the ends of their beaks and toes cut off with­out anes­the­sia — prac­tices know as debeaking and detoe­ing — to pre­vent them from injur­ing one another as they are crowded by the thou­sands into dark, filthy warehouses.
  1. Com­pletely unlike their wild ances­tors not only in terms of physique but also in hue, most com­mer­cial turkeys are totally white — the nat­ural bronze color selec­tively bred out of them to elim­i­nate uneven pig­ment col­orations — because of con­sumer pref­er­ence for even flesh tones.
  1. Cater­ing to con­sumer pref­er­ences for “white meat,” the indus­try has selec­tively bred turkeys to have abnor­mally large breasts. This anatom­i­cal manip­u­la­tion makes it impos­si­ble for male turkeys to nat­u­rally mate with females, elim­i­nat­ing these birds’ abil­ity to repro­duce with­out arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion. As a result, arti­fi­cial insem­i­na­tion is now the sole means of repro­duc­tion on fac­tory farms, where breeder birds are con­fined for months on end.
  1. Turkeys, like all ani­mals, love life and want noth­ing more than to live free from fear and pain. Yet turkeys, along with other poul­try, are not pro­tected by the fed­eral Humane Slaugh­ter Act. Every year, more than 46 mil­lion turkeys are killed, fre­quently with­out first being stunned, for Thanks­giv­ing dinners.

(Taken from Farm Sanctuary’s Novem­ber 23, 2010 press release.)

 

TURKEY SUBSTITUTES!

For earth and animal-friendly turkey sub­sti­tutes for your Thanks­giv­ing table click here!

When I went to visit Cedar Row Farm Sanc­tu­ary this past Octo­ber, I was sad­dened to find out that the turkeys that had whole­heart­edly greeted me in 2010 had passed. Turkeys are bred to have large breasts as this is the part of them that is in high­est demand for non-veggies. As a result, turkeys that are lucky enough to live out their lives end up hav­ing heart prob­lems among other issues. I was told that some­thing called the “flip” hap­pens. The “flip” is when their breasts become too large and they flip over on to them and die. When I heard this was the fate of my beau­ti­ful friends, I was truly upset. I had really looked for­ward to see­ing them again.

So on this day of thanks, let’s take a sec­ond and be thank­ful for all the crea­tures on this planet. Let’s instead eat some Tofurky with mush­room gravy while we hon­our all those we are grate­ful for.

Here’s to the turkeys! What an amaz­ing bird. If you get a chance to inter­act or hang out with one, I would highly rec­om­mend it. Happy Thanksliv­ing!

Oy Vegan!

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